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Holy Week Mass Times

Mass times in the Diocese of Calgary during Holy Week.

ParishCityLenten PenitentialPalm SundayHoly ThursdayGood FridayEaster VigilEaster Sunday
Ascension Calgary March 9th 7:30PM   8:00PM 12:00PM & 3:00PM At Notre Dame HS 8:30PM At Notre Dame HS 9:00AM & 11:00AM At Notre Dame HS
Canadian Martyrs Calgary April 4th 7:30pm   7:00PM 3:00PM (Syro Malabar Community Good Friday Liturgy: 10:30 PM) 8:30PM 10:00AM
CorpusChristi Calgary March 14th, 7:30PM Sat: 5:00PM, Sun: 9:00AM & 11:00AM 7:00PM ONLY 3:00PM ONLY 8:00PM ONLY 9:00AM & 11:00AM ONLY
Holy Name Calgary April 5 at 7:30pm April 8 at 5:00pm April 9 at 9:00am and 11:00am 7:00PM 3:00PM 9:00PM 9:00AM & 11:00PM
Holy Spirit Calgary March 14th, 7:30PM Saturday 5pm, 7:30pm (Spanish), Sunday 9:00am, 11:00am and 7:00pm (Sunday 11:30am at Our Lady of Peach Church) 8:00PM 12:00PM(In Spanish) & 3:00PM(In English) 9:00PM 6:00AM (Spanish), 9:00AM, 11:00AM and (11:30AM at Our Lady of Peace Church)
Holy Trinity Calgary            
Mary, Mother of the Redeemer Calgary   9:00AM (Italian), 11:00AM (Engilsh), 1:00PM & 6:00PM (Spanish) 5:00PM (Italian), 6:30PM (English), 8:00PM (Spanish) 10:00am: Way of the Cross 1:00pm (English) 3:00pm (Italian) 5:00pm (Spanish) 6:00pm (Italian) 8:00pm (English) 10:00pm (Spanish) 9:00am (Italian), 11:00am(English) & 1:00pm (Spanish)
Our Lady of Fatima Calgary            
Our Lady of M. Bistrica Calgary            
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Calgary     7:30PM 3:00PM 9:00PM  
Our Lady Queen of Peace Calgary            
Sacred Heart Calgary    7:30AM, 9:00AM, 11:00AM, 5:00PM  7:00PM  3:00PM 8:00PM  7:30AM, 9:00AM, 11:00AM, & 5:00PM
St. Albert the Great Calgary April 6th 7:30pm Saturday, April 8th 5:00pm, Sunday, April 9th 8:45am, 11:00am & 5:00pm 7:00PM 12:00PM & 3:00PM 8:30PM 9:00AM, 11:00AM & 1:00PM
St. Anne Korean Calgary            
St. Anthony Calgary     6:30PM 3:00PM 9:00PM  9:00AM and 10:30AM (English), 7:15AM and 12:30PM (Latin)
St. Bernadette Calgary April 5th, 7:00PM Saturday 5:00PM, Sunday 9:00AM & 10:30PM 7:00PM 3:00PM 9:00PM 9:00PM & 10:30PM
St. Bernard Calgary            
St. Bonaventure Calgary March 14th 7:30PM   9:00AM & 7:30PM 9:00AM, Noon & 3:00 PM 9:00AM, 10:00AM, 8:00PM 7:45AM, 9:00AM, 10:30AM & 12PM
St. Boniface Calgary            
St. Cecilia Calgary            
St. Elizabeth of Hungary Calgary            
St. Francis of Assisi Calgary            
St. Gerard Calgary            
St. James Calgary April 4th 7:30PM   7:00PM 3:00PM & 6:00PM 8:00PM ONLY 8:30AM, 10:00AM & 12:00PM
St. Joseph Calgary April 4, 2017 at 7:30 PM April 8 at 5PM, April 9 Sunday at 9AM, 11AM & 5PM. 7:00PM 12:00PM & 3:00PM 9:30PM 9:00AM, 11:00AM & 5:00PM
St. Luke Calgary April 5th   7:00PM 3:00PM & 6:00PM 9:00PM 8:30AM, 10:30AM, 12:30PM, 5:30PM & 7:30PM
St. Mark Calgary            
St. Mary's Cathedral Calgary            
St. Michael Calgary April 4th, 7:30PM   7:30PM 10:00AM & 3:00PM 8:00PM 9:00AM & 11:00AM ONLY
St. Patrick Calgary            
St. Peter Calgary            
St. Pius X Calgary March 29th, 7:30PM Saturday 5PM, Sunday 9AM, 11AM & 7PM 7:30PM 12:00 & 3:00PM 8:00PM 9:00AM & 11:00AM
St. Thomas Moore Calgary            
St. Vincent Liem Calgary            
Ste. Famille Calgary            
St. Paul Airdrie     7:00PM 3:00PM 9:30PM 9:00PM, 11:00AM & 7:00PM
St. Mary's Banff n/a n/a 7:00PM 3:00PM 8:00PM 9:00AM
Holy Trinity Blairmore            
St. Paul Brocket            
Our Lady of the Rockies Canmore     7:00PM 3:00PM 9:00PM 9:00AM & 11:00PM  
St. Gabriel the Archangel Chestermere            
Christ the King Claresholm            
Holy Trinity/St. Mary Cluny            
St.Ambrose/St.Catherine Coaldale St. Cath - March 16 7:00 pm St. Ambrose March 30 7:00 pm   St. Ambrose 6:00 pm, St. Catherine 8:00 pm  St. Ambrose 3:00 pm, St. Catherine 6 pm  St. Ambrose 9:30 pm  
St. Mary's Cachrane April 6th at 7PM Sat. April 8 at 5PM & Sun. April 9 at 10AM 7:00PM 3:00PM 9:30PM 10:00AM
St. Anthony Drunheller            
Holy Cross Fort Macleod            
St. George Hanna            
St. Francis de Sales High River 7:00PM   SFDS: 7:00PM & Vulcan: 7:00PM SFDS:3:00PM SFDS: 9:30PM SFDS: 11:00AM & Vulcan: 9:00AM
St. Martha Lethbridge April 5th at 7:00PM   7:00PM 3:00PM 8:00PM 9:00AM & 11:00AM
All Saints Lethbridge 10:00AM All Saints at Assumption   7:00PM Catholic Central High School East Campus. 3:00PM Catholic Central High School East Campus. 9:00PM 9:00AM & 11:00AM only
Holy Family Medicine Hat March 22nd 7:00PM Sat: 5:00PM Sun: 8:30AM, 10:30AM & 6:00PM 7:00PM 12:00PM & 3:00PM 8:00PM 9:00PM & 11:00AM
St. Patrick Medicine Hat March 29th, 7:00PM Sat Apr 8 5:00 pm Sunday April 9 9:00 am & 11:00 am 7:00PM 12:00PM & 3:00PM 8:00PM 9:00AM & 11:00AM
St. Peter Milk River March 24th 7:00PM          
St. James Okotoks April 4th at 7:00PM   7:00PM 3:00PM 9:00PM 9:00AM at St. Michael's & 11:00AM St. James
St. Catherine's Picture Buttee March 16th, 7:00PM          
St. Michael Pincher Creek     7:00PM 3:00PM 9:00PM 10:00AM
St. Rita/St.Mary's Beiseker Rockyford            
Immaculate Conception StandOff            
Sacred Heart Strathmore            
St. Augustine/St.Joseph Taber March 1st 9:00 am – Clearview Lodge - Taber 5:00 pm – St. Joseph’s – Vauxhall 7:00 pm – St. Augustine’s Taber   7:00PM at Both Parishes 9:00 am Cross Walk - Taber 3:00 pm Good Friday Services – at both St. Augustine’s and St. Joseph’s Taber/Vauxhall 9:30 pm - at both St. Augustine’s and St. Joseph’s Taber/Vauxhall 9:00 am at St. Augustine’s Church – Taber 11:00 am at St. Joseph’s Church - Vauxhall
St. Joseph's Vauxhall March 13 7:00PM          
Related Offices Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Lent

The Celebration of the Chrism Mass

On the evening of April 10, 2017 Bishop William T. McGrattan will celebrate one of the most significant liturgical events of the church year. Bishop McGrattan will gather with the priests, deacons, and laity of the Diocese at the Cathedral for the Chrism Mass. The gathering of a diocesan community around its bishop is the preeminent manifestation of the local church. The local church is one body made up of many parts with Christ as its head. The body is united with the crucified and risen Jesus — God’s anointed one — through baptism and as a community shares in the riches and consolation of Christ’s gift of the Holy Spirit through the sacramental ministry of its bishop and priests.

The Chrism Mass highlights the manifestation of the priests’ communion with the bishop.  Here also, the bishop acknowledges the services of the priests and deacons, often recognizing significant anniversaries of ordination. As a sign of loyalty and obedience, the priests renew their commitment to their vocation and ministerial service, promising fidelity in fulfilling their office in the Church and to the bishop. In the Diocese of Calgary, the deacons similarly renew their commitment. The bishop asks the faithful of the Diocese to continue to support him, as well as the priests and deacons through their ongoing prayers and love.

According to the Early Church Fathers, the olive tree was an image of God, the Father. The fruits that sprout from that tree are seen as the image of God, the Son. The image of God, the Holy Spirit is the oil that flows out in every direction as the purest extract of both the tree and the fruit.

In earlier times, oil was used in cooking, particularly in the making of bread, as a fuel for lamps, and as a healing agent in medicine. Moreover, the Jews anointed the head of a guest with oil as a sign of welcome. Oil beautified one’s appearance, and oil was used to prepare a body for burial. When the Church uses the blessed oil in its sacramental celebrations, it represents the outward sign of the power of salvation, which comes from the Trinity. At the Chrism Mass, three different oils are prepared. Two are blessed and one is consecrated, following traditions that have existed from very early in the Church’s history.

The oil of the catechumens is used to anoint those to be baptized as a reminder of the ancient athletes who once fought in the arena with their bodies covered in oil so that their enemies were unable to grab hold and hurl them to the ground. The catechumens are anointed with this oil to remind them that the Christian life is full of struggle, most especially a struggle with Satan and sin.

The oil of the sick is prepared to fulfill the instruction from St. James who wrote, “Is there anyone sick among you? He should ask for the priests of the Church. They in turn are to pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord. This prayer uttered in faith will reclaim the one who is ill, and the Lord will restore him to health. If he has committed any sins, forgiveness will be his” [Jas 5:14-15]. When administering the sacrament of the sick, the priest, anointing the forehead of the person, says, “Through this holy anointing, may the Lord in His love and mercy help you with the grace of the Holy Spirit,” and then anointing his hands, says, “May the Lord who frees you from sin, save you and raise you up.”

The Sacred Chrism is prepared in a special way. Chrism is a mixture of ­olive oil and balsam, an aromatic resin. In Old Testament times, the priest, prophets, and kings of the Jewish people were said to have been anointed. The biblical word for one who was anointed was Messiah. Translated into Greek, the language of the New Testament, Messiah becomes Christos, or Christ, who was anointed by the Holy Spirit. Being anointed means one is set apart, chosen, and directed to carry out the will of God. Therefore, this oil is used in the sacraments of baptism, confirmation, the ordination of priests and bishops, and the dedication of churches to set them apart for a special mission and purpose for God. During the consecration of the chrism the concelebrants at the Chrism Mass extend their right hands toward the chrism as the bishop says the consecratory prayer, signifying that in union with their bishop they share “in the authority by which Christ Himself builds up and sanctifies and rules His Body,” the Church [Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 1563].

At the end of the Chrism Mass, the oils that were blessed and the Chrism that was consecrated are distributed to representatives from every parish in the diocese for use in the celebration of the sacraments throughout the year. Individual parishes typically receive the holy oils in a procession at the beginning of the Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper later the same week.

In our spiritual journey, we have become joined to Christ through the celebration of the sacraments and are called, challenged, blessed, and anointed with the oils of gladness so that we too may become heralds of the good news by proclaiming glad tidings to the lowly, healing to the broken, liberty to those held captive, and comfort to the sorrowful.

Related Offices Carillon Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Diocesan Event

Chrism Mass

During this Mass, the Bishop blesses the oil of catechumens, the oil of the sick, and the oil of chrism. The chrism is freshly prepared for the baptising of catechumens at the Easter Vigil and the other oils are blessed on this day as well. As the Bishop is the only minister who can bless chrism, this liturgy ritualises his presence through the chrism that will be used by priests and deacons of the diocese throughout the year.

During the Chrism Mass, all priests are invited to renew their commitment to service and to receive the prayers of the people. This unique liturgy is an expression of unity of the diocesan Church with her Bishop in preparation for all liturgies throughout the year. All are welcome.

2017 Chrism Mass | Monday, April 10, 2017 at 7:30 PM | St. Mary's Cathedral
Chrism Mass Choir Information

Related Offices Bishop's Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Liturgy Liturgical Celebration

Ritual for the Unspoken Grief

I was away from home and from my husband when my miscarriage happened during my summer pastoral studies in Chicago. I remember answering the door to welcome a colleague during the first few days after the miscarriage. I was not keen for a visit since my pain was still raw, so we both just fell into a long silence after she told me how sorry she was for my loss. When I finally looked up and saw the gleam of tears in her eyes, I broke down and cried with her. Until today I still think of it as the day God wept with me.

When parents experience a pregnancy loss, frequently the grief goes unspoken because secrecy often accompanies the early stages of pregnancy. Support from the community can be rare, as most of the time most friends and family do not know anything about the loss. Even when the grieving parents do share their loss, the many kind comments and sentiments they receive often fail to alleviate the sorrow and guilt parents feel.

Surrounded by ministers who had been shaped by their life experiences and ministries, I was blessed to have been able to confide in those who understood and knew what I had been through. My experience as a liturgical minister did not help in preparing a ritual for my own child. The sorrow was very numbing and I was simply unable to be resourceful.

Looking back, words cannot express my gratitude for my thoughtful colleagues who prepared and organized a Liturgy of the Word to commemorate our loss. It is difficult to put pain adequately into words but rituals speak beyond words alone because they consist of symbolic actions and language. It allowed me to give voice to my pain through prayers and lamentations. It sanctified my experience as I was entrusted to God’s loving care and compassion.

It is truly a humbling experience to be at the receiving end of so much love and support, and to encounter Christ in the face of friends and family. As God’s people, we are not meant to grieve alone. God weeps with us. In the embrace of the community, grieving parents allow themselves to be sustained and cared for as they put the pieces of their lives back together. Our grieving should naturally unite us with the community, a place where both have something to give and receive.

The Diocese of Calgary invites parents, their families and friends to join us in a prayer gathering by attending the Memorial Liturgy for Miscarried and Stillborn Infants on Friday, March 24, at 7:00 p.m. at Sacred Heart Church, 1307 - 14th Street SW. For more information or to RSVP, please visit our website at www.miscarriageliturgy.ca.

Related Offices Carillon Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Liturgy

Learn by Heart: A Gift You Can Give Yourself

Memorization has fallen out of favour these days. In grade school I was required to learn some soliloquies from Shakespearean plays and then write them out in their entirety by memory. Today I cannot recall my own cell phone number but I could still make a fair attempt at reciting the Bard’s verse! I wonder if students are still asked to memorize anything today. Why bother, you might ask, with Google at your fingertips? Catholics have always been known for their recitation of rote prayers and the repetition of rituals. Our faith uses ritual language and gestures to affect us at a level deeper than our conscious thought. Yet, who has not at some time found themselves rattling off the words to a prayer while their mind is elsewhere? The response is not to stop memorizing but rather to consider and practice what it really means to learn something by heart.

To know something by heart means you have it memorized but it also implies that — in the way the heart animates the body by pumping blood — the text or gesture is inside of you, animating your every word, action, and thought. Think about the things that you know by heart: a recipe passed down through several generations, a loved one’s date of birth, your banking PIN. What you know by heart says something about your history, your relationships, and your priorities.


Part of our identity as Catholics includes knowing by heart the texts, gestures, and rituals that shape our belief and bind us to one another.


Most of us have memorized some traditional Catholic prayers like the Hail Mary and a blessing before meals. We also know the Lord’s Prayer and the ordinary parts of the Mass. Yet, when it comes to the Mass texts, we often know them only conditionally. It is easy enough to recite something surrounded by others reciting the same thing or when reading from a screen but if you try to recite the prayers alone, you might falter. Sometimes saying a prayer quickly can help the memory until you trip up and then have to go back to the beginning because you did not really know what you were saying anyway. Or perhaps you can sing the texts but if the melody is taken away, you become completely lost. These levels of memorization are admirable but their conditional nature challenges us to deepen our efforts by revisiting familiar texts, pondering their meaning, learning more about them, and inviting them to penetrate our hearts.

Making the effort to learn by heart is a gift you can give yourself. Once you have learned a prayer by heart, it becomes yours to pray at any time in any place. We do not always know in advance when we will need a prayer and so when the need arises, we may not have at hand a bible, a prayer booklet, and definitely not a projection screen with PowerPoint! With memory you can look into your heart for prayers to implore God’s help, receive consolation, to comfort others, to strengthen those whose faith may be wavering, or to draw together with others in prayer. If you are still looking it up on Google, it is not yet yours.

Part of our identity as Catholics includes knowing by heart the texts, gestures, and rituals that shape our belief and bind us to one another. During this season of Lent, consider learning by heart a new liturgical text. Strive not to only rattle off the words by memory but rather to savour the texts, learn what they mean, and pray the words so that, having learned them by heart, they can animate every word, action, and thought of your life.

Here are some suggested texts to learn by heart:

  • Apostles’ Creed and Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed
  • Gospel Canticles from the Liturgy of the Hours: Benedictus (Canticle of Luke), Magnificat (Canticle of Mary), Nunc Dimittis (Canticle of Simeon)
  • Psalms, especially 23, 34, 95, 141
  • Angelus and for Easter season, Regina caeli

You can find texts to memorize:

  • in most hymnals
  • in the Sunday or weekday missalette
  • on the Internet

Tips for memorization:

  • read the text over many times
  • read portions of the text and repeat it to yourself
  • repeat the text to others
  • practice writing down the text
  • test yourself on your recall of the text
  • use mnemonic devices like melodies or images
Related Offices Carillon Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Liturgy Prayers
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