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Famine Relief for South Sudan, Somalia, Nigeria and Yemen

The CCCB, along with other faith leaders in Canada, has launched a national appeal to help address the famines and extreme food shortages in these four countries.

The threefold response is:

Related Offices Social Justice Bishop's
Related Themes Social Justice Donation

2017 Women Religious Jubilarians

Please join us congratulating our women religious jubilarians of 2017 for their years of devoted service. They have been a joyful witness to all!

Sr. Helen Hengel, SCSL (75th Anniversary)
Sr. Mary Spence, SCSL (75th Anniversary)
Sr. Clemence Liboiron, SCSL (70th Anniversary)
Sr. Marjorie Perkins, FCJ (65th Anniversary)
Sr. Theresa Parker, SSM (60th Anniversary)
and Sr. Patricia Derbyshire, SCSL (50th Anniversary)

The women religious of the Diocese of Calgary are looking forward to participating at One Rock 2017. Please stop by and say hello!

Related Offices Vocations
Related Themes Jubilarians Vocations Women Religious

One Rock Celebrates Canada 150 Anniversary

Every year, the City of Calgary welcomes one festival after the other – highlighting the best of everything – including food festivals, flower festivals, and cultural festivals, among many others. This year, the Catholic community will host its eighth annual faith festival, One Rock, with Bishop William McGrattan!

Thousands of young adults, and their families, from across Western Canada, will gather at One Rock, the biggest faith festival in Canada to enjoy a faith-filled weekend!

Young people of today face the most aggressive and invasive life challenges of our time; a constant barrage of deceptive distractions vie for their attention, leading them towards a faithless future. It is in the service of others that we turn our attention to the young people in our parishes, universities and communities, and give them tools to enrich their lives.

At the Wine and Cheese One Rock fundraiser event held a couple of weeks ago, Bishop McGrattan quoted Pope Francis who said to the Canadian western bishops, “We need to listen to our young people and work for them.” We all have to support the festival in every possible way, and promote One Rock to serve our young people for when we do, we are “serving the Lord” [Eph. 6:7].

One Rock has touched the young adults’ lives in different ways. One Rock has produced many good fruits of our faith, including hundreds of young people who now give more to their community and local church.

Enthusiastic attendees from last year said, “Through One Rock, we developed a stronger connection to our faith, which was strengthened through each other. As a result of our experience at One Rock, we have started many youth activities at St. Basil’s parish, such as a scout and guides program, and our own youth summer camp two weeks following One Rock. Ever since last summer, we have been counting down the days until One Rock 2017 and we are very excited to relive some of our best moments as not just a youth group, but as a family.”

One Rock has also been a source of vocations to Catholic priesthood and religious life. One young lady shared that, “One Rock was where I found my vocation by listening to one of the Sisters of Life who was talking about the joy of consecrated life. Right after that, we had time of adoration and I had a beautiful moment where I heard God speaking to me, ‘this could be you!’ One Rock has changed my life!”

This year we are hosting many Canadian artists and presenters who promise to make our music festival more exciting, fun, unique and faith filled! Some of the artists include The Informants, Flood the Stone, and several local talents as well. We are delighted to welcome Leah Darrow and Fr. Raymond De Souza as our main speakers this year! Leah is a former US model, daughter, sister, wife and mother… but most especially she is a redeemed daughter of God! Our Sunday program will showcase the amazing multiculturalism of Canada on its 150th anniversary.

Services including free babysitting, and shuttle buses from Calgary to the festival site will be offered. Exhibition booths will offer much to browse through and purchase. Camping at the festival site for the weekend is highly encouraged.

Its positive energy is contagious and has people coming back year after year!

Pope Francis exhorted the young people of the world by saying, “The one who evangelizes is evangelized, and the one who transmits the joy of faith receives joy.”

When asked about One Rock this year, a wise young man said, “it is impossible to write about the spirit that the people brought to One Rock; you would have had to be there to have experienced it.” Bring your family and friends and make One Rock part of your summer plans!

One Rock 2017 will take place on August 11, 12 and 13 at the beautiful and awe-inspiring location Tsuut’ina Rodeo Grounds in Redwood Meadows, Bragg Creek area, AB.

For more information, to purchase tickets, or to sign up as a volunteer please visit: www.onerock.ca

Related Offices Youth & Young Adult Carillon
Related Themes Diocesan Event Youth One Rock

The Diocesan Detective Commemorates the Lacombe Home

By the spring of 1885, there was trouble brewing in the West. Louis Riel protested conditions to the Canadian Government on behalf of the Metis and some Cree bands in central Saskatchewan and started the North West Rebellion. Prime Minister John A. Macdonald sent soldiers on the CPR to put down the uprising and protect settler’s communities on the prairies.

The Blackfoot Confederacy had been approached by Riel to join in the fray and people in Calgary and surrounding areas were nervous. What would Crowfoot do?

Once again, Fr. Lacombe was called upon to take his place on the national stage and he made several visits to Crowfoot to ensure his loyalty and control over the heavily-armed young warriors.

One of the most important telegrams in Canadian history was sent to Ottawa by Lacombe. It simply read: “I have seen Crowfoot and all the Blackfoot. All quiet. Promised me to be loyal no matter how things turn out elsewhere.”

The Riel Rebellion was over by the summer of 1885 and one of the outcomes of the danger in Saskatchewan became a benefit for Calgary. Bishop Grandin transferred some Sisters of the Faithful Companions of Jesus, the FCJs, away from the area near the rebellion. Fr. Lacombe had just finished building a brand new two-story Oblate rectory and chapel for the mission. He gladly turned it over to the Sisters for their convent and a school room. Once again Fr. Lacombe would be living in a tent on the prairie… but it was all for a good cause!

In December of 1885, the first school district in the North West Territories was erected… Lacombe Roman Catholic School District #1, with Mother Mary Greene fcj, as its first superintendent. Later the name would be changed to the Calgary Catholic School District.

In 1886, Prime Minister Macdonald invited Crowfoot and the other chiefs from southern Alberta, who had remained loyal during the Rebellion, to tour eastern Canada and receive honors. Fr. Lacombe accompanied them and was effectively their tour guide. On their visit to Ottawa, Crowfoot got up to make a speech and he acknowledged his friend: “This man, the Man of Good Heart, is our brother — not only our Father, as the white people call him — but our brother. He is one of our people. When we weep he is sad for us, when we laugh, he laughs with us. We love him. He is our brother.”

Crowfoot died in 1890, after being baptized by Fr. Doucet. Fr. Lacombe honored his friend, the Great Chief, by writing a biography of his life for newspaper publication. It was the end of an era.

The last 30 years of Fr. Lacombe’s life were not filled with the dramatic history-making events of his hey-day in the national spotlight, but his travel schedule and the list of his accomplishments is still impressive. From the age of 60 Fr. Lacombe tried to retire at least five or six times, but there was always something to do!

He had built himself a chapel-cabin at Pincher Creek, in southwest Alberta in 1885, dedicated to St. Michael, and called it his “hermitage,” a place he could go for solitude and use as a home base. He would return there repeatedly over the years until 1908… but he was never there for long.

In 1909, he was inspired to create what he called, “the most beautiful dream of my life!” It would be located in the Calgary area and called the Lacombe Home… for orphans and the elderly.

He approached Patrick Burns, one of the Big 4 founders of the Calgary Stampede. Burns owned the large Bow Valley Ranche and donated 200 acres of land on a bluff overlooking Fish Creek, close to Macleod Trail and the Midnapore CPR station. Lord Strathcona, of CPR fame, made a significant donation as did many of Lacombe’s old friends.

The Sisters of Providence agreed to administer and serve at the Home and it was opened in November, 1910. An aging Fr. Lacombe was its first resident.

At the dedication he said: “We are now ready to receive all those in need who will come and knock at our door. The elderly will find solace in their time of suffering. The little ones will find devoted mothers to care for them.”

The Lacombe Home was declared a Provincial Historic Site in 1979, but the building burned down in 1999. The area today is home to St. Mary’s University, the Sisters of Providence Convent, the Fr. Lacombe Care Centre, and the Providence Care Centre. The Fish Creek/Lacombe C-Train station honors the history of the area.

By 1913, Calgary and southern Alberta had become its own Diocese led by Bishop McNally. St. Mary’s was now a Cathedral and Fr. Lacombe made his last public appearance there in March of that year. He finished his remarks with these words:

“Many years ago, I stood here on this piece of ground and pictured myself the time when a great Cathedral would stand here.

I will not be with you very long now. I want to plead with you for the poor and the needy and the destitute. God bless you for your kindness to those needy ones at Midnapore. God bless you, people of Calgary, God bless you!”

Fr. Lacombe died on December 12, 1916 in his room at the Lacombe Home. After a funeral Mass at St. Mary’s Cathedral, his casket was taken by a CPR “ceremonial train” up to Edmonton to lie in state at St. Joachim’s Church for a few days of public veneration… a parish he had founded 60 years earlier.

Later he was buried at St. Albert, crossing the Sturgeon River Bridge for the last time. His body lies in a crypt beneath the St. Albert Church beside those of Bishop Grandin and Fr. Leduc.

That’s in Treaty #6 Territory, traditional lands of the Cree. They called him… “the Noble Soul.”

But his “heart,” at his request, is still in southern Alberta, buried in a small cemetery behind the Sisters of Providence Convent overlooking Fish Creek Provincial Park.

That’s here, in Treaty #7 Territory, traditional lands of the Blackfoot. They called him: “The Man of Good Heart.”

Related Offices Archives Carillon Library
Related Themes Diocesan History Evangelization

Celebrating the World Day of Migrants and Refugees

The Church has been celebrating World Day of Migrants and Refugees each year since 1914. World Refugee Day has been marked by the UN on June 20 since 2000.

This year, join us on June 29, the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul, for a special mass to celebrate World Day of Migrants. This is an opportunity for the faith community to reflect upon the role migration has played in our history and tradition, pray for migrants and refugees around the world, and raise awareness about the causes, challenges, and opportunities involved with migration.

Join Bishop William McGrattan on June 29, 7:00 p.m. at St. Mary’s Cathedral to celebrate World Day of Migrants and live the words of Pope Benedict: “The Church is God’s family on earth” [Deus Caritas Est].

Related Offices Social Justice Bishop's Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Social Justice Canada 150 Prayers Refugees
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